GCCW Q&A

August 15, 2015

We have been interviewing GCCW participants to gain more insight into why academics all around the world are getting involved in GCCW and what they are planning to do. Here is the first batch of these interviews.

Q&A with Dr William Burns, Co-Executive Director, Forum for Climate Engineering Assessment, a Scholarly Initiative of the School of International Service, American University

Q1: Why will you be taking part in GCCW?

Dr William Burns: I think it’s important for academics to engage the community in discussions on critical climate change issues, as well as to engage students in programs outside of environmental studies and sciences. We contemplate an event that provides an overview on a controversial option for addressing climate change, climate geoengineering, followed by an effort to engender public deliberation on the topic.

Q2: How are your preparations for GCCW going (if you’ve started those preparations)? Are there many other people in your area who are eager to get involved with GCCW? Have you started planning any activities yet?

Dr William Burns: Yes; we’re organizing this event under the rubric of Berkeley Energy & Climate Institute. The event will be held on campus, and will include refreshments and facilitators.

Q3: How do you see your discipline contributing to understanding and/or combating climate change?

Dr William Burns: My discipline is the law; our discussion of climate geoengineering will include a discussion of potential governance mechanisms for research and development and/or deployment, as well as how the law could help us structure public deliberations. It’s our hope to develop an article that grows out of the public deliberative process.

Q&A with Professor Noel Castree. Professor of Geography at the University of Manchester

Q1: Why will you be taking part in GCCW?

Professor Noel Castree: Because climate change is a real threat to human life and other life forms on Earth if humanity does not dramatically reduce its ecological footprint.

Q2: How are your preparations for GCCW going (if you’ve started those preparations)? Are there many other people in your area who are eager to get involved with GCCW? Have you started planning any activities yet?

Professor Noel Castree: I’m taking a lead role at the University of Manchester and trying to get the president to endorse the week, with a set of activities already in the planning stage.

Q3: How do you see your discipline contributing to understanding and/or combating climate change?

Professor Noel Castree: Geographers are already key contributors, especially when it comes to adaption and mitigation measures. But we have more radical things to say too and these need to be heard in public and political debates.

Q&A with Dr Lisa Roberts. Visiting Fellow in the University of Technology, Sydney Faculty of Science, and Visiting Scientist at the Australian Antarctic Division

Q1: Why will you be taking part in GCCW?

Dr Lisa Roberts: I will show and tell how a global movement of scientists and artists is evolving to co-investigate how living things (including us) respond to climate change, and how we co-create public exhibits and co-author publications.

Q2: How are your preparations for GCCW going (if you’ve started those preparations)? Are there many other people in your area who are eager to get involved with GCCW? Have you started planning any activities yet?

Dr Lisa Roberts: Last month I had a practice run for this event and will try it out on a new audience next month. I am hoping to enlist a live performer to be part of the UTS event, from amongst the artists in conversation with scientists through the Living Data program.

Q3: How do you see your discipline contributing to understanding and/or combating climate change?

Dr Lisa Roberts: As an artist and Visiting Fellow in the Faculty of Science, my contribution will be to inspire more artists and scientists (some of whom are also scientists), to engage in conversation and be open to new insights emerging from this to expand understandings of all involved.